Posts tagged science
Preventing Blossom End Rot

Blossom-end rot is a serious disorder of tomato, pepper, and eggplant. Growers often are distressed to notice that a dry sunken decay has developed on the blossom end (opposite the stem) of many fruit, especially the first fruit of the season. This nonparasitic disorder can be very damaging, with losses of 50% or more in some years.

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The Great DST Debate

Are you ready to “spring forward” this weekend?  I am!  I’m not a morning person, and it will be nice to actually enjoy some daylight when I get home from work.  However, in both spring and fall we see in the media and online a debate about whether to do away with Daylight Saving Time, stay on Standard Time, or switch to some other plan altogether.

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The Difference Between Peaches and Nectarines

Last night I had a customer that messaged us via Facebook.  She was wondering if we still had peaches.  Unfortunately we are out, but we do have nectarines.  Did you know that nectarines are just peaches with their fuzz shaved off?  Really!  We have a crew locked in a back room at Bob’s equipped with razors.  Not buying it?  Me neither.  However, genetically speaking, it isn’t that far from the truth.

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Apples: Making History Then & Now

The apple is the pomaceous fruit of the apple tree, species Malus domestica in the rose family (Rosaceae). It is one of the most widely cultivated tree fruits, and the most widely known of the many members of genus Malus that are used by humans. The tree originated in Western Asia, where its wild ancestor, the Alma, is still found today.

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